Results from the RDA Test Committee

The US RDA Test Coordinating Committee released its final report today in which it concluded that “RDA should be implemented by LC, NAL, and NLM no sooner than January 2013. The three national libraries should commit resources to ensure progress is made on these activities that will require significant effort from many in and beyond the library community.”

The Committee clearly struggled with the business case for implementing RDA, stating that “the test revealed that there is little discernible immediate benefit in implementing RDA alone. The adoption of RDA will not result in significant cost savings in metadata creation. There will be inevitable and significant costs in training.”  Given the potential benefits of RDA to the end user, however, the Committee recommends the implementation of RDA.

The Committee recommends that “Library schools should ensure that all of their students are familiar with FRBR concepts and terminology, the International Cataloguing Principles, and the value and potentials of linked data on the Web. While advanced cataloging students who will be graduating within the next year will need to have some familiarity with AACR2, the schools should be transitioning from teaching using AACR2 to RDA, so that students graduating in 2013 and on are ready to join staff who will be using the new rules.”  I think this statement is perhaps a little naive.  The view that only some familiarity with AACR2 is necessary is problematic, since for the immediate future, a lot of work will be needed to convert existing AACR2 record to RDA.  My students would have struggled significantly with RDA had they not been well versed in AACR, so it’s not clear that RDA can work as a standalone at the moment, given the current state of library catalogue records. This statement does not distinguish between advanced and basic cataloguing skills.

If a program has only one cataloguing course, how is it possible to provide adequate instruction in both AACR2 and RDA?  Do you teach only RDA?  Teaching FRBR alone requires a fair amount of work, and I find that in programs where cataloguing is not a required course (which is quite common), ensuring a good understanding of FRBR is very challenging, since students often lack sufficient understanding of, and grounding in, cataloguing practice.   Our students are introduced to FRBR in our core Organization of Information course, but since this is a survey course, not  much time can be given to this topic. It was only once students had a firm  grasp of AACR and library cataloguing that they could appreciate FRBR, and this includes only those students who took the  basic and advanced cataloguing courses.  It would have been helpful for the Committee to perhaps consult in more detail relevant instructors in LIS programs to get a more comprehensive view of the instructional landscape, as one brief paragraph isn’t sufficient to address this very important area.

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The British Library and Google to make 250,000 books available to all

The British Library will be working with Google to digitize over 40 million pages of text ranging from 1700-1870.  I can only imagine how chuffed I would have been to have access to digital books when I was completing my Master’s thesis on New France and Quebec, especially since I lacked the funds to peruse some of the original texts in Quebec City. A remarkable opportunity for historians and scholars.  Of particular interest is the digitization of Sir Anthony Panizzi’s treatise Of the Processes and Judgements against those accused of High Treason and Membership of Proscribed Sects in the States of Modena, 1823, in the original Italian.  I look forward to browsing through the work of the man who played a key role in the development of cataloguing standards.

British Library – Press and Policy Centre – The British Library and Google to make 250,000 books available to all


Of the Processes and Judgements against those accused of High Treason and Membership of Proscribed Sects in the States of Modena, 1823,

The British Library and Google today announced a partnership to digitise 250,000 out-of-copyright books from the Library’s collections. Opening up access to one of the greatest collections of books in the world, this demonstrates the Library’s commitment, as stated in its 2020 Vision, to increase access to anyone who wants to do research.

The British Library and Google today announced a partnership to digitise 250,000 out-of-copyright books from the Library’s collections. Opening up access to one of the greatest collections of books in the world, this demonstrates the Library’s commitment, as stated in its 2020 Vision, to increase access to anyone who wants to do research.

The British Library and Google today announced a partnership to digitise 250,000 out-of-copyright books from the Library’s collections. Opening up access to one of the greatest collections of books in the world, this demonstrates the Library’s commitment, as stated in its 2020 Vision, to increase access to anyone who wants to do research.The

Post-Secondary Education: Cornerstone of Our Knowledge Economy

This article presents a business case for why governments should continue to invest in, and support, higher education institutions.  I think that even in a university-intensive city such as Halifax, it’s easy to forget the economic impact that universities have on the community. Naturally, I believe the intellectual impact is of greater importance but this post by Fred Morley may help to address the bottom line that may inform the deliberations of  government institutions.

Post-Secondary Education: Cornerstone of Our Knowledge Economy – SmartCity Blog.

 

Conference presentations this spring and summer

In a continuation of my research on the use of social media and Web 2.0 applications to organize information, I am presenting several papers this summer. At the Atlantic Provinces Library Association conference in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador on 17 May 2011, I gave the paper, “The Public Library Catalogue as a Social Space,” co-authored with Laurel Tarulli. On 4 June 2011, I presented the paper, “The Public Library Catalogue as a Social Space: A Case Study of Social Discovery Systems in Two Canadian Public Libraries,” at the Canadian Association for Information Science Conference in Fredericton, New Brunswick. At the same conference, I spoke about “Social Discovery Tools: Cataloguing Meets User Convenience,” on 3 June 2011.

I will present the paper “Social Discovery Systems and User-Generated Metadata,” at the North American Society for Knowledge Organization conference in Toronto on 17 June 2011 and on 5 July 2011 I will be in London, England to present the paper “Faceted Navigation of Social Tagging Applications,” to the International Society for Knowledge Organization.

In addition to reporting on research work, my colleague, Sandra Toze, and I spoke about “Using Social Media to Leverage Corporate Intelligence and Tacit Knowledge,” at sessions organized by the Dalhousie University Centre for Advanced Management Education in Ottawa on 26 April 2011, Toronto on 29 April, and in Halifax on 3 May. On 2 June 2011, on my behalf, Sandra addressed the Maritime Access & Privacy Workshop in Halifax on the topic of “Governance and E-Discovery.”

Are we wired for mobile learning?

This infographic captures nicely the changes we have experienced over the years with respect to the use of instructional technologies.  Certainly with respect to my teaching environment, we haven’t yet explored fully the uses of mobile technologies to enhance learning.  Part of the problem stems with the cost of providing new and better learning technologies and the infrastructures and staff needed to support them.  The apps for mobile learning are certainly something I am going to explore.


Via: Voxy Blog