Embracing a new skill: Sewing

I have toyed with the idea of sewing for a while now. I have spent most of my life focused on developing the mind and, frankly, dismissed most crafts as being too stereotypically female. Even as a child, my interests lay in intellectual pursuits, rather than learning how to sew or knit: I considered these activities to be too “girly.”  I still face these biases today, to be honest, but I have approached crafts from another perspective, namely that of reducing my carbon footprint. For the past 5 years, I have made all of my own cleaning products, and most of my personal-care products. I am quick to point out that I don’t do so to avoid “chemicals” as is, sadly, a myth that so many people perpetuate. Water, for example, is composed of chemicals, as are many “natural” products that we use every day, such as baking soda. I do, however, strive to use ingredients that have reduced environmental impacts; further, I wish to avoid buying unnecessary packaging. Yes, some of the ingredients I use, such as vinegar, do come in containers, but I try to buy most products in bulk, using my own containers. Nothing can be truly zero waste, of course, since bulk products come in packaging, need to be shipped, and so forth, but I do what I can to reduce my use of packaging.

My DIY products are as follows:

  • All-purpose spray cleaner
  • Laundry soap
  • Dish soap
  • Floor cleaner
  • Dusting spray
  • Fabric spray
  • Deodorant
  • Hand cream
  • Face serum
  • Lip balm
  • Face tonic
  • Leave-in conditioner

I try to use single products for several applications; for example, I use a 1kg bar of Savon de Marseille to handwash clothes, to clean counters and sinks, and to make laundry and dish soap. I use vinegar and isopropyl alcohol for all-purpose cleaning sprays and floor cleaner. I used to make my own toothpaste, but I noticed that it did not remove plaque as effectively as commercial toothpaste and, further, I have no intention of giving up fluoride, as there is plenty of scientific evidence to show its positive impact on reducing tooth decay. I use shea butter as a lip balm and night cream.

I knit and crochet household goods such as face cloths and dish cloths. I’ve made some scarves as well. I don’t tend to wear sweaters, and find that hand-knit sweaters take up too much closet space. I’ve pared down my wardrobe considerably, so I don’t want to add to what I have.

Sewing is the latest way in which I wish to reduce my environmental impact. I realize, of course, that sewing machines and their accessories are not carbon-free. Still, I embrace sewing as a way to make my own products, particularly if I can reuse materials. I prefer to learn on my own, so I am finding videos online to help me learn. My first projects have been simple: Handkerchiefs (I have not used tissues for nearly 20 years), cloth bags for the bulk store, a small pillowcase for my mini-buckwheat pillow, and a pouch to store nightwear. I  will move on to tablecloths, large pillowcases tea towels, and so forth. Eventually, I hope to make my own clothes.

I still have to deal with my years of associating crafts with stereotypical attitudes towards women. On the other hand, I find great pleasure in creating something physical, especially as this activity stands in direct contrast to the largely intellectual pursuits that have shaped most of my life.

 

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