Spring cleaning, 2017 edition

As I have stated before, I actually enjoy doing housework. I’m a tidy person who hates clutter, and I find housework to be soothing. Most people think I’m odd in this regard, but I’m not bothered.

I weed my house on a regular basis; most people like use to the term “de-clutter,” but I prefer the term that is used by professionals in my field. Because I weed about twice a year, it’s never too onerous a task. I rotate my clothes twice a year, and have been paring down my clothing considerably. My love of shopping is no secret, but I’ve made huge dents in this practice over the past two years. I am reducing the number of clothes that I wear, preferring to rotate a smaller number of good-quality items, rather than have a large number and variety of clothes. I do not intend to buy any new (or used) clothes for the spring and summer. Capsule wardrobes are very popular right now; I’ve been working on mine for the past four years and have made good strides. I’m not normally one for trends, but since I have hated clutter since childhood, this trend suits me perfectly.

It’s amazing how much one still manages to accumulate even with regular weeding. This month I focused on the kitchen, only I was more ruthless this time around. I got rid of small appliances that I had not used in at least a year: A juicer, a food processor,  a bread maker (which had stopped functioning properly), and a soy milk maker (ditto). I’ve tried juicing, but never embraced it fully; I much prefer to eat my fruit and vegetables, as juicing removes all the fibre. If I do feel the need to juice, I can use my Vitamix, which juices the whole vegetable, rather than separates the juice from the pulp. My Vitamix has replaced the need for my large food processor. I have a two-cup mini food processor that I use to make my laundry soap, dice onions, etc., so there was no need to keep the large one.

As I explored my kitchen cupboards, I found at least four containers of rice in different places. I have a weakness for storage containers; this comes from being a very organized person. The problem, however, is that I had simply too many storage containers in different places; as a result, I would forget that I had these containers, and would buy more rice, etc., from the bulk store. I now use the cupboard that housed the small appliances as my pantry so that I can see all my storage containers with dried beans, pulses, pasta, rice, and so forth. I got rid of a lot of mugs that I don’t use. It feels good to see empty shelves, and I plan to keep them that way.

Using simply cleaning products such as vinegar, water, and liquid castille soap, I washed the walls and baseboard, and painted the kitchen shelves and use shelf liners to protect them. The biggest challenge was re-painting the baseboards. I enjoy painting, even if my knees complain from all the bending; the problem, as I found out, is that my companion felines Atticus and Calpurnia like painting as well. I now have two Pepe Le Pew cats, only their white stripes are not quite as symmetrical.  Fortunately, the paint does peel off.  I intend to re-paint all the room and closet doors as well; I’m sure some cat whiskers will be embedded in the results.

As I continue to weed my home (laundry room and bathrooms this week), it bothers me to generate such waste. I will donate some items to charity shops, but the fact that I have produced such waste still bothers me. I fully appreciate the irony that a proportion of this waste consists of storage containers that are meant to help keep everything organized. The problem with buying storage containers is that you buy things to fill them with. My approach over the past two years has been to buy something only to replace an item that I need. So, for example, I keep only a very small number of mugs (I am not one for entertaining much at home; I’m too introverted for that); no matter how many beautiful mugs I might come across, I will buy one only to replace a mug that has broken or become chipped.

I have made great strides in reducing my shopping habits; in my various travels over the past two years, I have purchased only two dresses, three scarves, a crucifix, a rosary ( I collect rosary beads), and a bracelet (a birthday present for me on behalf of my mother). Travelling with only carry-on luggage helps reduce what  I can buy but, frankly, I’m losing the interest in buying anything. I still like to window shop and admire good-quality items, but I find myself applying the “do I really need this? What do I need to discard to make room for this?” approach. My single biggest challenge is to not buy handbags; it’s my biggest achilles heel, but I have improved considerably.

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