Elate Cosmetics

Update: I’ve now used the Elate mascara and am pleased with the results. Unlike a number of other vegan mascaras I have used, this one is not wet and sticky, and stays on all day without sticking. It’s a keeper.

While I make all of my household cleaning products, and most of my personal care products, cosmetics are items I still buy. I have been using mineral makeup for at least 15 years and have gone through a number of different brands. It’s important that the products I use be made in Canada; they must also be vegan, of course, and create as little waste as possible. I had been using products made in Nova Scotia but, to be honest, the quality of their minerals was not as high as I would have liked. I very much like the ZuZu Luxe products, but they are made in the US. An attractive feature of these products is that they do use refillable products (unfortunately, refills are not sold in the local stores here), but they do use a lot of plastic.

I am pleased to have found a Canadian brand that not only uses refillable products, but also bamboo for its containers, rather than plastic. Elate Cosmetics is based in Victoria, BC. Their products are vegan and mineral based. They sell bamboo containers for their makeup, which you refill with powder, eye shadow, and so forth. The mascara is not refillable, but it does come in a bamboo container. The products were shipped in the smallest possible box, encased in tissue paper, and held in place with some recyclable packing peanuts, which double also as my cats’ new favourite toy. The products came with a lovely hand-written note from the owner.

The picture on the left shows the bamboo container filled with the foundation powder, which came in the small paper package to the left of the compact. The tube is the mascara, also in bamboo. The picture on the right shows the top of the compact. I was a little alarmed when I saw the colour of the powder, as it looked too dark for me, given pale and fair skin. The colour does not go on as dark as it looks, and it works quite well for me, but I will go up a lighter tone next time. This particular shade is described as fair, with warm tones, and looks lighter on the website. Next time I will select the shade up, which is for very fair skin with neutral undertones. The powder goes on well and gives the matte look that I like. My skin is delicate in nature, but I have not experienced any reactions to the powder so far. I haven’t tried the mascara yet. I have not had much luck with vegan mascaras, as I’ve found most of them to be very sticky, so I’m crossing my fingers. I will update once I use it.

The costly side of eco living

An article in today’s Guardian discusses the phenomenon that I have often observed to be associated with eco living namely, that it caters to a higher socio-economic status:

Many of the companies and individuals marketing a sustainable lifestyle tend to give the impression that it takes place on another fairytale planet, and is unattainable for normal people down here on the ground with limited cash, who have to go to work every day.

This phenomenon has been true for a very long time. I have always been struck by the often ridiculously inflated prices that are charged for environmentally-friendly alternatives. I think that this can be problematic because,  a) it gives the message stated above; and b) it feeds into people’s egos and makes eco living a competitive shopping sport, where it becomes a matter of showing off brands.

In many cases, there are much cheaper and reasonable alternatives that don’t need to cost an arm and a leg. You don’t need to spend a fortune on reusable kitchen towels, for example; you can easily cut old towels into rags for this purpose. I buy inexpensive sackcloth towels from my pharmacy that last a very long time. You can re-use all those glass jars that once held jams, condiments, and so forth, to store and freeze food; there is no need to buy overpriced mason jars that serve only to replicate these humble glass jars. Re-using in this manner serves also to cut down on waste. Stainless steel tiffin boxes are a little pricey, but they last for years, so they are an excellent investment. Buying expense eco cleaners ($8 for dish soap? Completely and utterly absurd) is unnecessary when you can easily make your own products for much less money. Full disclosure: I used to buy a lot of these expensive products, but realized that I was simply generating more waste by doing so. No matter how recyclable a product, waste is generated to produce and recycle it. I have slowly weaned myself off this buying cycle. I now use bars of Marseille de Savon soap to clean bathtubs, counters, handwash laundry, make laundry soap, and wash dishes. This soap does not come in any containers, serves multiple purposes, and works far better than any eco cleaner I have ever bought. I buy 1kg bars of soaps that last a long time. The humble vinegar and baking soda work like a charm.

I don’t mind investing money into a product that will last for a long time, and which I cannot replicate easily myself, but I think we need to be careful of supporting overpriced eco products especially if, ironically, they serve only to add to further waste and consumerism.

 

Spring cleaning, 2017 edition

As I have stated before, I actually enjoy doing housework. I’m a tidy person who hates clutter, and I find housework to be soothing. Most people think I’m odd in this regard, but I’m not bothered.

I weed my house on a regular basis; most people like use to the term “de-clutter,” but I prefer the term that is used by professionals in my field. Because I weed about twice a year, it’s never too onerous a task. I rotate my clothes twice a year, and have been paring down my clothing considerably. My love of shopping is no secret, but I’ve made huge dents in this practice over the past two years. I am reducing the number of clothes that I wear, preferring to rotate a smaller number of good-quality items, rather than have a large number and variety of clothes. I do not intend to buy any new (or used) clothes for the spring and summer. Capsule wardrobes are very popular right now; I’ve been working on mine for the past four years and have made good strides. I’m not normally one for trends, but since I have hated clutter since childhood, this trend suits me perfectly.

It’s amazing how much one still manages to accumulate even with regular weeding. This month I focused on the kitchen, only I was more ruthless this time around. I got rid of small appliances that I had not used in at least a year: A juicer, a food processor,  a bread maker (which had stopped functioning properly), and a soy milk maker (ditto). I’ve tried juicing, but never embraced it fully; I much prefer to eat my fruit and vegetables, as juicing removes all the fibre. If I do feel the need to juice, I can use my Vitamix, which juices the whole vegetable, rather than separates the juice from the pulp. My Vitamix has replaced the need for my large food processor. I have a two-cup mini food processor that I use to make my laundry soap, dice onions, etc., so there was no need to keep the large one.

As I explored my kitchen cupboards, I found at least four containers of rice in different places. I have a weakness for storage containers; this comes from being a very organized person. The problem, however, is that I had simply too many storage containers in different places; as a result, I would forget that I had these containers, and would buy more rice, etc., from the bulk store. I now use the cupboard that housed the small appliances as my pantry so that I can see all my storage containers with dried beans, pulses, pasta, rice, and so forth. I got rid of a lot of mugs that I don’t use. It feels good to see empty shelves, and I plan to keep them that way.

Using simply cleaning products such as vinegar, water, and liquid castille soap, I washed the walls and baseboard, and painted the kitchen shelves and use shelf liners to protect them. The biggest challenge was re-painting the baseboards. I enjoy painting, even if my knees complain from all the bending; the problem, as I found out, is that my companion felines Atticus and Calpurnia like painting as well. I now have two Pepe Le Pew cats, only their white stripes are not quite as symmetrical.  Fortunately, the paint does peel off.  I intend to re-paint all the room and closet doors as well; I’m sure some cat whiskers will be embedded in the results.

As I continue to weed my home (laundry room and bathrooms this week), it bothers me to generate such waste. I will donate some items to charity shops, but the fact that I have produced such waste still bothers me. I fully appreciate the irony that a proportion of this waste consists of storage containers that are meant to help keep everything organized. The problem with buying storage containers is that you buy things to fill them with. My approach over the past two years has been to buy something only to replace an item that I need. So, for example, I keep only a very small number of mugs (I am not one for entertaining much at home; I’m too introverted for that); no matter how many beautiful mugs I might come across, I will buy one only to replace a mug that has broken or become chipped.

I have made great strides in reducing my shopping habits; in my various travels over the past two years, I have purchased only two dresses, three scarves, a crucifix, a rosary ( I collect rosary beads), and a bracelet (a birthday present for me on behalf of my mother). Travelling with only carry-on luggage helps reduce what  I can buy but, frankly, I’m losing the interest in buying anything. I still like to window shop and admire good-quality items, but I find myself applying the “do I really need this? What do I need to discard to make room for this?” approach. My single biggest challenge is to not buy handbags; it’s my biggest achilles heel, but I have improved considerably.

Better Eating International

I have been part of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a non-profit organization, Better Eating International, which wants to create videos to help people learn about, and transition into, a plant-based diet. The idea behind these videos is to educate people about the abuse of factory farmed animals, as well as to highlight the benefits of a plant-based diet. The organization does not intend to use shock value in these videos but, rather, animation to make its points. A lot of people can’t bear to watch the often graphic depiction of how animals are treated, thus the message can get lost; the idea is that a gentler approach might be more effective in reaching a larger number of people. As an educator, I appreciate the organization’s wish to educate, rather than to shock. The campaign overreached its financial target, which means that the project should go ahead. I look forward to the results.

Goth toothpaste

img_4213-2I thought that my teeth were looking a little dull lately, so I explored some options for tooth whitening. I had no interest in using any whitening strips, as they create far too much waste. I tried one of those dual-tube products, where you brush with the first tube of toothpaste, then with the second tube of whiteners. I tried a sample, and was horrified with the results. The whitening product contains a lot of hydrogen peroxide, and it bleached my gums, not to mention hurt them. No, thanks.

I came across a glass jar of a natural toothpaste that contains activated charcoal. The product is made by Nelson Naturals, located in Nelson, B.C.; the company makes only toothpaste. The toothpaste makes your entire mouth black when you use it; I look like an extra in a Goth film. It’s actually rather fun to see the effect. The toothpaste is messy (the jar warns you about this), but I’ve been impressed with how well it works. My teeth look whiter since I started using it Saturday. I brush with it only once a day.

 

 

Earth-friendly spring cleaning, Canadian style

I am one of those odd people who enjoys doing housework; I am particularly fond of ironing, which I find very soothing. Because I do some housework every day, I don’t find the need to do spring cleaning as such, but for those who do, I thought I would share some Canadian cleaning products that are earth friendly, and whose companies have a long-standing commitment to the environment (i.e., no greenwashing). I make my own cleaning products, but for those who are not inclined towards DIY, and who want to use locally-made products, the list below might be of some use:

Bio-Vert: Bio-Vert environmentally-friendly cleaning products are manufactured by Savons Prolav Inc., a family owned and operated company based in Laval, Québec.  They use only recycled plastic containers, and sell refills. An interesting fact is their use of square-shaped containers, which allows them to fit more of them on shipping pallets, and thus reduce transport costs.

Nature Clean: Their website is being overhauled right now, so I can’t determine where these products are made, but if memory serves, they are based in Ontario. Their products are all scent-free, which I very much appreciate.

Gentle Earth: This company is based in Victoria, BC.  They sell products at both the retail and wholesale levels.

Eco-max: These products are made in Oakville, Ontario. The company uses Bullfrog Power to make its products, which are EcoLogo certified.

Attitude: These products are made in Montreal.  The company uses renewable energy sources, is EcoLogo certified, and makes only vegan products.

Sapadilla: These products are made in Port Coquitlam, BC.  Their products do contain fragrance, but it’s derived only from essential oils, and are phthalate-free.

Effeclean: These products are made in Toronto.  The products are all plant-based, and the company does a very good job of explaining all the ingredients that it does not use.

Down East:  The products are made in Dartmouth, NS. Their cleaning products were the first in Canada to be EcoLogo certified.

 

Cleanser-free cleansing

I have been working hard to pare down the number of personal care products that I use. My skin is dry and sensitive, so I have always cleansed my face with cleanser in the evening only, using only warm water in the morning to remove any residual night cream. Even though I am careful to use very gentle cleansers, my skin still tends to feel tight afterwards, and I certainly can’t use exfoliating products, as they are all too harsh. I bought a product the other day that can help me cut out one more personal care product. The product is a facial cloth called Erase your Face. You simply wet the cloth in warm water, then wipe your face and eyes. I am amazed by how well the cloth works: All traces of makeup were gone, including mascara and eyeliner. No tugging of any kind was necessary. Removing eye makeup has always been a challenge, as there is always the possibility of irritation, even though I have typically used only sweet almond oil. Using only warm water is not only environmentally friendly, but economical, and much easier on my skin; I did not need to use a cleanser afterwards. I used the tissue test on my face, and there was absolutely no residue left. The cloths wash out very well; I simply wash them in the sink with a bar of Savon de Marseille and hang to dry. I bought the cloths at Bed, Bath, and Beyond; it’s an excellent investment of $14 for a product that should last a very long time.